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PIPS Reports
Pakistan Security Report (April 2011)



Published: May 10, 2011


An Overview
With no let up in violence Pakistan’s security situation showed no signs of improvement. This month’s security landscape was marred with mounting assaults and ambushes of the militants against security forces’ check posts and their patrolling convoys in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) and Balochistan. In Khyber agency of FATA clashes erupted between Mangal Bagh-led Lashkar-e-Islam (LI) and an alliance of Zakhakhel militia, dissident faction of LI and Ansarul Islam (AI), after Zakhakhel tribe developed differences with Mangal Bagh. Meanwhile the February 5 ceasefire agreement signed between Sunni and Shia tribes of Kurram agency fell apart owing to an increase in attacks on traffic convoys along Thall-Parachinar highway. Pakistan army’s counter-militancy operation Barekhna continued in Mohmand agency. Meanwhile in Balochistan recovery of bullet riddled dead bodies of Baloch nationalist political leaders and activists continued providing further fuel to separatist fervor of nationalist resistant movement. In retaliation of these killings Baloch militants target killed a leader of Pakistan Muslim League Nawaz Khuzdar Chapter, Sardar Mahrullah Umrani. Karachi once reverberated with sectarian and ethno-political violence. The assassinations of a former provincial legislature of Mutahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) and a religious scholar of Jamia Binoria left city in a vicious cycle of violence. Moreover, this month militants of Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) targeted three buses of Pakistani navy with remote controlled explosive devices in Karachi. With the exception of a suicide attack on the shrine of Sakhi Sarwar in Dera Ghazi Khan, situation in Punjab was more or less peaceful. Similarly security situation in interior Sindh, Gilgit Baltistan, Azad Kashmir and Islamabad remained peaceful as well. This month a total of 174 attacks—including six suicides attacks—were witnessed which claimed lives of 237 people and injured 458 others.  
    
Insurgency hit province of Balochistan was the most volatile area of the country where 69 attacks killed 59 people and injured 94 others; whereas with 53 reported terrorist attacks FATA was the second most affected area of the country where 45 people were killed and 88 others were wounded. In KPK—third worst hit area of the country—37 attacks were witnessed that claimed 50 lives and injured 67 others. Meanwhile in Karachi nine attacks left 33 people dead and 106 others wounded. Similarly three attacks in Punjab claimed lives of 50 people and injured 102 others. Some sporadic acts of violence in parts of interior Sindh left one person injured along with causing damages to state infrastructure. (See Chart 1) 

Chart 1: Terrorist Attacks in Pakistan in April 2011

If the casualties in terrorist attacks, operational attacks by the security forces and their clashes with the militants, inter-tribal clashes and cross border attacks throughout the country are counted collectively, the overall number of casualties reaches 728 killed and 668 injured. In 25 incidents of ethno-political violence 62 people were killed and 48 others were wounded. Whereas four border attacks and clashes —including drone strikes—killed 35 people and injured 12 others. (See Table 2)

Table 2: Nature of Attacks
Type of attack/clash

Number of attacks/clashes

Killed

Injured

Terrorist/insurgent attacks

174

237

458

Clashes b/w security forces and militants

25

211

69

Operational attacks by security forces

16

113

19

Drone attacks

3

35

12

Border clashes

1

-

17

Political and ethnic violence

25

62

48

Inter-tribal clashes

16

70

45

Total

260

728

668

Comparison of last three months’ security landscape with this month’s security features reveals a mix trend. The overall number attacks and incidents of violence have slightly declined; due to a dip in the US drone strikes. Whereas number of killings has increased sharply owing to a large number of civilians killed in terrorist attacks, especially suicide attacks, and militants assassinated in security forces’ operational attacks and in their clashes with the security forces. Meanwhile the number of injuries has declined considerably owing to less number of civilians injured in this month compared to last few months. (See Chart 3) 

Chart 3: Comparison with Three Months’ Figure

The maximum number of casualties is of the militants with 379 life losses and 92 injuries. Majority of these casualties occurred in security forces’ operational attacks and clashes of the militants with the security forces as well as drones strikes. The second highest number of casualties is of the civilians who have been killed in terrorist attacks. The civilians suffered 295 death casualties and 55 injuries. In the terrorist attacks and their clashes with the militants the security forces lost 44 troops; among them 19 FC, 14 police, 16 army and five Levies force personnel and injured 183 others—among them 78 FC, 15 police, 86 army and four Levies force personnel. (See Table 4, 4a)

Table 4: Detail of Casualties April 2011


Table 4a: Distribution of Casualties April 2011
Type

Killed

Injured

Civilian

295

393

Militants

379

92

FC

19

78

Police

14

15

Paramilitary

-

-

Army

16

86

Lvs

5

4

Rng

-

-

Total

728

668

Among a variety of tactics used by the militants the most commonly used tactic was of firing or shooting with 50 reported incidents. Meanwhile Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) were the second most commonly used tactic with 39 reported incidents. Landmine assaults were the third most commonly used tactic with 24 reported incidents. Similarly 17 incidents of remote controlled bomb blasts and 11 incidents of rocket attacks were also reported. (See Table 5) 

Table 5: Attack Tactics Used by Terrorists
Attack  Tactics

No. of Tactics

SA

6

RA

11

BH

1

RCB

17

KID

6

LM

24

FR

50

SAB

1

TK

9

BT

5

HG

5

IED

39

Total

174

 

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